REVIEWS

Review: Ben Wheatley's 'Free Fire' is a Crazy Fun and Comical Ride

Ben Wheatley's Free Fire

It's difficult to say which is sharper in Ben Wheatley's latest film, Free Fire: the bullets being fired by the nefarious characters found within or the witty jabs those characters tend to fling at one another between the continual barrage of deadly gunplay. One may kill you, but the other may actually hurt your feelings. As with his previous films, Wheatley presents Free Fire with a gleefully dark sense of humor, the ridiculousness of events playing out made all the more senseless when you take into account where everyone's mindset is at. That sense of humor – not to mention the aberrantly comical characters – washes the onslaught of violence down all the easier, though, and, with Free Fire, Wheatley once again proves to be a unique voice

 Posted April 21 in Review | Comments

Review: 'The Fate of the Furious' Delivers Insane Action and Little Else

The Fate of the Furious Review

How much can you really analyze the films of The Fast and the Furious franchise at this point? They know what they are, and the fans of these movies definitely know what awaits them with each, new entry. The formula is evident: fast cars, silly dialogue, colorful but badass characters, and family, always family. The eighth and latest entry, The Fate (F8) of the Furious, is no different from the rest, and, though the film provides an endless slew of over-the-top and impressive stunts and a complete disregard for the laws of physics, it never recreates the feeling of excitement this franchise has delivered so many times before. The motor propelling The Fast and the Furious series may not be completely out of steam, but the check engine

 Posted April 14 in Review | Comments

Review: Jordan Vogt-Roberts' 'Kong: Skull Island' is Awesomely Weird

Kong: Skull Island

Kong is back, and the beast has never been this vicious. Since the 1933 classic, King Kong, the cinematic variations on the creature have been as varied as they are impressively crafted by the film world's latest technology. The stories surrounding humans trekking to his home, Skull Island, have twirled about similar predicaments, though: they venture to the island, encounter the impressive Kong, kidnap him for display in the world of man. The giant ape deserves a shot of adrenaline, and it's director Jordan Vogt-Roberts who has come in to deliver that shot. Kong: Skull Island is a thrilling entry into the storied franchise and not only in expected ways. With energetic pacing and breathtaking visuals the film satisfies on the typical levels, but Skull Island also drops in a bit of weirdness that easily sets it apart from modern monster movies.

 Posted March 10 in Review, SciFi | Comments

Review: Jordan Vogt-Roberts' New 'Kong: Skull Island' Reigns Supreme

Kong: Skull Island

In the entire history of cinema, only a few select films are so influential, so ingrained in our popular culture, that they become a modern myth. 1933's King Kong, directed by Merian C. Cooper & Ernest B. Schoedsack, is one of those films. As the original effects-driven blockbuster and monster movie milestone, Kong has been re-imagined, parodied, and referenced countless times since first being unleashed more than eight decades ago. Each one of us has, at some point in our lives, encountered The Eighth Wonder of the World. Whether it's a remake, like John Guillermin's 1976 film, or Peter Jackson's in 2005, or a reference made in The Simpsons, The Rocky Horror Picture Show, or Jurassic Park, the legend of the colossal ape endures.

 Posted March 8 in Review, SciFi | Comments

Review: 'Logan' is Actor Hugh Jackman's Finest 'X-Men' Outing to Date

Logan Review

Australian actor Hugh Jackman looks tired playing Wolverine. Granted, anyone would give off the same level of weariness if they played the same role in nine films across 17 years, so there's very little blame to be laid at the actor's feet here. It isn't a tiredness in having to play Wolverine so often, though, that makes the fatigue so palpable in the movie Logan, the actor's latest and presumably final appearance as the most famous member of the X-Men squad. That's simply his emotional mindset being conveyed in this latest entry into the X-Men franchise, the culmination of an exhausting life for the self-healing mutant. Packing as much emotional punch as it does sci-fi, blockbuster thrills, Logan ends up being a near-perfect sendoff for the character and exactly what any fan of this series would want in a finale for the beloved character.

 Posted March 3 in Marvel, Review | Comments

Review: James Mangold's 'Logan' is Brutal, Beautiful & Heartbreaking

Logan Movie Review

Australian actor Hugh Jackman first played the character of Wolverine back in 2000 in the film that launched the modern day, comic book blockbuster - Bryan Singer's X-Men. Now 17 years later, the Academy Award-nominated actor has inhabited the character an unprecedented nine times on the big screen — that's more times than Roger Moore suited up as James Bond or Robert Englund terrorized Elm Street as Freddy Krueger. With Logan, out in theaters everywhere on March 3rd, Jackman and director James Mangold (of Walk the Line, 3:10 to Yuma, and The Wolverine) craft something special as a means of laying to rest Jackman's iconic role: an intimate, character-driven film that is brutal, beautiful, and deeply affecting.

 Posted March 1 in Marvel, Review | Comments

Berlinale 2017: 'Wilde Maus' Amusingly Profiles a Critic's Breakdown

Wilde Maus Review

There's nothing like watching someone breakdown completely. Wilde Maus, which translates simply to Wild Mouse, is a dark comedy film from Austria which premiered at the Berlin Film Festival. Austrian actor Josef Hader makes his feature directorial debut with the film, also writing the screenplay and starring as the lead character, a music critic from Vienna who loses his job after 20 years. The film follows Hader as Georg, who goes bonkers and starts wandering around Vienna trying to make sense of his life after losing the job that kept him focused for so long. He ends up creating some unnecessary problems with his wife, and randomly partners with a guy who wants to run a little rollercoaster at Vienna's Prater amusement park.

 Posted February 22 in Berlinale, Review | Comments

Berlinale 2017: Mangold's 'Logan' is an Excellent Wolverine Western

Logan Review

Let's make this clear right at the start - this is not another Marvel Studios movie. Logan is a stand-alone, outstanding, one-of-a-kind X-Men movie made for adults. It's violent as all hell, emotional and captivating, gritty and grounded, and exciting to experience. Director James Mangold really hit a home run with this one, bucking the trend and going with his gut to deliver a superb "Wolverine Western". I had to see Logan twice at the Berlin Film Festival before writing this review, to confirm how awesome it is. I haven't enjoyed watching an X-Men movie this much in such a long time, and I'd say this is easily one of the best X-Men movies. It's not really an X-Men movie, but it actually is - there's so much mutant mythology hidden within.

 Posted February 18 in Berlinale, Marvel, Review | Comments

Berlinale 2017: Geoffrey Rush Delights as Giacometti in 'Final Portrait'

Final Portrait Review

Nothing like watching artists work. Final Portrait is a film directed by Stanley Tucci (of Blind Date, The Impostors, Big Night previously) starring actor Geoffrey Rush playing the famed Swiss artist Alberto Giacometti. If you don't know who Giacometti is, it's better to get acquainted with him and his incredible sculpture work before getting into this film. Final Portrait tells the story of, literally, his final portrait as an artist - a painting he did of an American novelist who was visiting Paris, where his studio was, in the 1960s. The film has a small, intimate feel to it exploring the pained life and quirky antics of a great artist, which is becoming increasingly common these days (e.g. Inside Llewyn Davis, Maudie, Mr. Turner, Love & Mercy).

 Posted February 17 in Berlinale, Review | Comments

Berlinale 2017: Entertaining Animated Chinese Film 'Have a Nice Day'

Have a Nice Day Review

Imagine if Quentin Tarantino was Chinese and made an animated crime drama. That's kind of what Have a Nice Day feels like, in a way. Have a Nice Day (originally titled Hao ji le in Chinese) is a film from director Jian Liu that just premiered at the Berlin Film Festival in the main competition line-up. The animation style is closer to "Archer" or A Scanner Darkly, and the film is sort of a Coen Brothers-esque story about a bunch of people in a small Chinese town who get mixed up chasing a bag of money. There are a few minor political themes, but it's fairly light entertainment, with some fun moments and colorful characters. Oddly enough, this film is better than half of what I saw in competition at the Berlin Film Festival, even if isn't that smart.

 Posted February 17 in Animation, Berlinale, Review | Comments

Berlinale 2017: 'Return to Montauk' is a Tender Look at Love & Regret

Return to Montauk

"We cross and re-cross our old paths like figure-skaters." That's a line from Cloud Atlas, but I kept thinking back to that film (and that storyline in it) while watching this one. Return to Montauk is the latest drama from German director Volker Schlöndorff, set primarily in New York following a few German characters around the city. It's a very tender, heartfelt film about the great regrets and lost loves in our lives, and how we attempt to get over what happened in the past (or, perhaps, not get over our past regrets). Maybe it's because I connected to it in a very personal way, but Return to Montauk kept me captivated and awake and intrigued from start to finish. Even if I didn't feel emotionally drained by the end I was certainly enthralled.

 Posted February 15 in Berlinale, Review | Comments

Berlinale 2017: Outstanding Anti-Hunting Polish Dark Comedy 'Spoor'

Spoor Movie Review

Vegetarian vengeance! I don't even know how to begin to describe how much I loved this film. Spoor, also known as Pokot originally, is a film from Poland about an elderly former teacher who lives in a small town. She loves her two adorable dogs, but one day they go missing, and thus begins this thrilling story of animal lover vengeance. The cinematography in this film is STUNNING, some of the best since The Revenant, and I really mean that. Along with an incredibly unique score from Antoni Lazarkiewicz, and exceptional lead performance by Agnieszka Mandat-Grabka, this won't be a film you forget. And that isn't even the half of it - there's so much I loved, and even if I can't describe it all perfectly, I hope my enthusiasm is apparent.

 Posted February 12 in Berlinale, Review | Comments

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